Common Questions

How much does Bankruptcy cost?

Bankruptcy does cost money to execute

Bankruptcy is a legally mandated process and there are regulations that will determine how your financial position can be remedied by. This means that specialised people would need to work with you to ensure that you and the people you owe money to are protected and treated equally in the eyes of the law.

We will try to explain how all aspects of the Bankruptcy process in Australia is calculated from a cost point of view. This is our way to help you feel assured that no matter the money it will costs to manage the process, it is channelled to ensure you achieve the best value and outcome.

How do I know what is costing money during the Bankruptcy process?

There are a number of fees that are charged by various entities to ensure that the Bankruptcy process is followed correctly. This process therefore mandates the time and resources to ensure this is done exactly as the law stipulates. These steps were designed to protect you and the people you owe.

Our services help you to save as much time and money as possible so that you can be on your road to recovery a lot sooner. Let’s look at some of the costs that may be incurred during a Bankruptcy process.

Interest charged by your creditor

As with any debt agreement, interest is charged. If you do not make the minimum required payments, you would need to know that additional penalties and interest may be levied to your agreements.

This is why it is important to not waste time when you decide to approach an expert as it will prohibit any further charges to be levied to your account. An appointed trustee will be able to halt any further charges by creditors or legal action.

Fees charged by the Australian Financial Security Authority (AFSA)

Depending on the process and the intricacies of your situation, the AFSA may charge fees to help facilitate all the steps needed to conclude your Bankruptcy process lawfully. These fees may change, and it is always good to speak to an advisor.

Be sure to know when some of these fees are expected to be paid as the process might not proceed if they are not paid. By partnering with us, we take away the burden of keeping track of all the charges. Things the AFSA could charge for could include but are not limited to the following:

  • Publishing details of a notice of meeting of creditors on AFSA’s website
  • Online self-service search using the Bankruptcy Register Search
  • Inspecting a publicly-available document
  • Application for a bankruptcy notice
  • Application for extension of time for the service of a bankruptcy notice
  • Debt agreement proposal lodgement fee
  • Document processing fee (payable when controlling trustee authority is lodged with AFSA)
  • Overseas travel application fee
  • Application for statutory notice
  • Taxation of a bill of costs in relation to the administration of an estate
  • Taxation of a trustee’s remuneration in an estate
  • Application to be registered as a trustee or debt agreement administrator
  • Initial registration
  • Renewal of registration (every 3 years)
  • Realisations charge
  • Interest charge, and
  • Administration fees

Why it is more sensible to partner with us

Our value proposition to you is simple. We have the knowledge, expertise and qualified professionals that understand the hardship and emotions that come with a Bankruptcy process.

We handle every case differently and aim to have a resolution that is quick, simple, and cost effective. Our clients understand the value in working with the people that want to ensure you are protected and assisted in the best possible way.

We always ensure that any further costs are kept to an absolute minimum so that you can get back on your feet as quickly as possible.

The one thing money can’t buy when working with us is the peace of mind we offer to our clients. This is because we put your interests first and will do everything in our power to let the law come to the best possible outcome that helps everyone.

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What you need to know before declaring bankruptcy